» » Perestroika Combo - Yeah, Yeah, Yeah?
Perestroika Combo - Yeah, Yeah, Yeah? Album
Perestroika Combo - Yeah, Yeah, Yeah? Album
Performer: Perestroika Combo
Title: Yeah, Yeah, Yeah?
Label: Not On Label
Country: Germany
Released: 1991
Rating: 4.3/5
Format: MP3, FLAC, WMA
FLAC size: 2337 mb | MP3 size: 2024 mb | WMA size: 2602 mb
Genre: Rock
Tracklist

1Peter-Das Gewehr
2De De Ron Tür
3Bellenteins
4Komplikation V
540 Jahre Spàter
6Yeah, Yeah, Yeah (Film - Movie)
7Timisoara - Posaune
8Shut Up
9Raindogs (Underground)
10Satisfaction

Video

Comments (1)
Ironrunner
I know little about this group, other than they consist of Voda Tudor on keyboards; Andree Krause on guitar & vocals; Steffanie Lingsminat on bass vocals; Frank Neubert on drum & Holgar Kaack on guitar/vocals.
Side one opens with "Komplikation V" which starts like a cross between the DEAD KENNEDYS' "California Über Alles", MAGAZINE in their latter days & MODERN ENGLISH minus the synth assaults. It soon becomes a fast, full- sounding instrumental like a beefed-up, straight-forward early 4AD track. "Shut Up" has a quirky fairground clumsiness to composition & playing which makes it again a little like MAGAZINE, this time circa their debut album. "Raindogs" slowly builds up into a junk-structure of keyboard-lead circling music - driving itself faster & faster, noisier & noisier as it builds towards a crescendo. It's trance music for the hypertense. Towards the end you are reminded of VELVET UNDERGROUND at their more chaotic, then ceases it's driving force only to build again into the sane blood-pumping tempo. "40 Jahre Spater" opens somewhere around the BEEFHEART / BIRTHDAY PARTY area before thundering off on a Punk-like audio cruise - fast guitar forcing the structure along. At times it reminds me of THE STRANGLERS circa the first album - powerful with GREENFIELD-like piano driving along. "Bellentiens" has a degree of Folk/Medieval/Trad to it - utilising violin to great effect. It has a quirky, amusing feel to it - slightly mad in a sort of BONZO DOG meets ATARAXIA style!

Side two opens with the title track "Yeah, Yeah, Yeah", a purely crazy little tale, in a style similar to but darker than VIV STANSHALL & IVOR CUTLER - over a simple little delicate rhythmic cycle. It bursts out into a full-flung Punk celebration going at a fair rate with silly voices over the top. It slows again to conclude this oddball little tale. "Timisoara - Posaune" opens with a heavy horn introduction deliberately clumsy & all the more effective for being so. It gels into another sub-STRANGLERS piece, again recapturing the dark atmosphere of "California Über Alles" and injecting mystery ingredient 'X' in to make it a catchy, driving piece of music. The vocalist on this piece has a softer female voice, but still has enough cracks in it to remain obviously PERESTROIKA in style. Like THE RESIDENTS, they chose "Satisfaction" as a suitable track to cover - and do it in a much more straightforward way - a fastish sub-Punk thrash-out reminding one of the more shambolic, Rock pieces by the VELVET UNDERGROUND set to the tempo of SLAUGHTER & THE DOGS' version of "You're Ready Now". It closes with a slowed-down, altogether more strange & experimental version of the STONE's record. The vocalist could almost be in pain, and the instruments sound none too well, twanging, scraping along to the plodding four note structure. "Peter - Das Gewehr" is a sort of version of "Peter Gunn" built on constant grinding bass while keyboards snake their serpentine way across the top in a style crossed between GREENFIELD & MANZAREK. Finally we are given "De De Ron Tür", which is dedicated to BOB DYLAN and is a departure from his "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" tune - and is rather deliberately out-of-tune, grating against, the ears in detuned chaos.

That these folk can play there's no doubt - that they are proficient enough to play off key is also beyond question. But how wide is their appeal? That depends whether you like any of the above groups mentioned. If you like two or more, it's a fairly safe bet that you'd like the album.

Originally reviewed for Soft Watch.